Posted 1 month ago

rydenarmani:

a rant about the women against feminism hashtag

Posted 2 months ago

When my children start to express curiosity about sexuality, I am not going to tell them that they’re too young to be asking or that “if you have sex you get pregnant”. The age at which children start to ask about sex indicates they are already ready to be talking about it. Some parents may find it is much earlier than they expected, and others may find that their children never want to talk about sexuality. It is a very personal subject, but it should not be taboo.

When a girl walks into the restaurant wearing a tight skirt, I am not going to tell my daughter that the girl is a slut and forbid her from dressing similarly. Instead, I am not going to comment at all unless someone else does. Whether it is a nudist walking in or a woman wearing a burka, it will not be my place to comment and I will teach my children to never voice their judgments either. However, if my children or anyone else comments on the “slut” walking in, I am going to tell them that you cannot judge how many people someone sleeps with based off how they dress, and that you should not judge them based off how many people they sleep with either.

When my son teases his friend that he is being a “pussy”, I will chastise him. I will not have my children contribute to a society that condemns femininity. I am also going to tell my son that he is not obligated to dedicate his life to masculinity, nor sentence anyone else to a specific gender role. My children will not think that their gender correlates to a specific color or behavior. People are not pure shades of pink and blue, but rather unique combinations with real texture.

When my children start to lock their doors and bring home partners, I am not going to forbid them from getting physical or demand to know every detail. Instead, I will make sure that they know everything about being safe and have clear access to protection. I will not be that parent that starts screaming hysterically when they find a condom in their child’s bedroom. Through communication and honesty, I will make sure that my children can have the safest and most fulfilling sex life possible.

the way sexuality was never addressed in my family  (via harukimuracallme)

(Source: moon-sylph)

Posted 2 months ago

fuchsimeon:

humansolatium:

tinydragongina:

elizabitchtaylor:

I’m such a nice girl, I’m so sick of being fuckzoned!!!!!!!

What’s the fuckzone you ask? it’s this zone that guys put you in where they only want to fuck you; they don’t want to have a friendship with you and they aren’t satisfied with emotional commitment, they just want sex!!!!!

I’m a nice girl!!!! Stop putting me in the fuckzone!!!!!!!

image

omfg yes

That is the best answer to that “friendzone” bullshit I have ever read.

Posted 2 months ago

We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, ‘You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise you will threaten the man.’ Because I am female, I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support. But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors – not for jobs or for accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are.

We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, ‘You can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise you will threaten the man.’ Because I am female, I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support. But why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors – not for jobs or for accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are.

(Source: donatellavevo)

Posted 3 months ago
There are people who can’t stop caring about others too much for they do know what it feels to be alone and left behind.
njchvrcmr (via psych-facts)
Posted 3 months ago

vex138:

and stop viewing feminists as man haters!

Posted 3 months ago

elenascupcake:

#YesAllWomen because Rihanna can make a song about enjoying sex and sing about the way she likes it, and it gets banned in 11 countries, while Robin Thicke can completely diminish the line of consent and objectify women in the process in a song and it is a ‘smash hit’ and gets to number one in multiple countries.

Posted 4 months ago

es-tro:

andymasfar:

krystalynterski:

peachdoxie:

garnetflare57:

Some Nigel Thornberry gifs I’ve collected over a while.

Every so often one of these comes across my dash and I just start laughing hysterically because this meme is simultaneously one of the most pointless yet entertaining things ever.

oh my god

Thank you

Why am i laughing so hard?

Posted 4 months ago

anexperimentallife:

One of the women who organized the dance first complained about Claire’s dress, but upon checking, admitted that it conformed to the standards set for the event. Nonetheless, the same woman later pulled Claire aside and told her that some of the dads—who had been watching from a balcony—felt her dancing was “too provocative” and liable to cause “impure thoughts.”

When Claire pointed out that she hadn’t even been dancing, other chaperones joined in, again told her that her dress was too short (despite having verified it was within standards, and despite other girls having shorter dresses), and, finally kicked her out of the dance.

What made Claire so provocative that these men couldn’t control themselves? Well, apparently the fact that she’s 5’9, with long legs, and built more like a grown woman than like a typical teenager. That’s it.

The problem isn’t that these men found her to be attractive; the problem is  that they and others—including other women—held Claire responsible for the men’s unwillingness to control their own reactions.

The message here is that if a man has difficulty controlling himself around a woman he finds attractive, it’s the woman’s fault for being too “provocative.”

Let me emphasize that point for those who still don’t get it: Women are held accountable for men’s reactions. This is why when a woman reports a rape, or sexual harassment of any kind, among the first questions asked—by both men and women—is inevitably, “what was she wearing?” And unless she was covered head to toe, there are inevitably comments like, “Well, what did she expect?” Even if the woman was wearing baggy sweatpants and a sweater three sizes too big, there are far too many who’s first response is, “Well, she must have done something.”

And this, my friends, is rape culture.

Read the Gawker story here, and Claire’s blog post here.

Posted 4 months ago

pridefulvanity:

next time someone tells you Muslim countries oppress women, let them know Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Turkey, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, and Senegal have all had female Presidents or Prime Ministers and 1/3rd of Egypt’s parliament is female but the US has yet to even have a female vice president and can’t say “vagina” when discussing female reproductive rights

(Source: la-rinascente)